A South St. Tradition Lives On

A South St. Tradition Lives On
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A South St. Tradition Lives On

Raising funds to reopen Ron's Ribs, a 30 year old business in Philadelphia

$925 raised
100% Complete (success)
110 sold This fund was a success! Orders will arrive approximately 14 business days after the fund ends on Jul 8 2013
https://www.facebook.com/RonsRibs
Ron’s Ribs was born in 1984 at 1627 South Street; a neighborhood store-front on a quaint block of traditional Philadelphia row-homes. For over 60 years, the address has historically operated as a Black-owned barbeque establishment. Before Ron’s Ribs, Bea Bea’s Lawnside Grill stood for 40 years as the delicious barbeque pit of South Street. Bea Bea’s was so popular that she bottled her hot sauce for retail sales in stores across the local area. The restaurant was established in a vibrant, African-American business district, near iconic organizations such as the headquarters of “The Philadelphia Tribune”. However, the construction of highways decimated the flow of traffic to the area, and business in the neighborhood slowly declined. Many area establishments, such as the historic Royal Theater, fell into financial hardship. Ms. Lawnside eventually decided it was time to retire her legendary business and sold to a young man she had known for most of his life -- Ron Washington.

The summer of 1984, Ron’s Ribs came to life in undoubtedly the perfect location for a downhome rib joint -- the renowned “South Street.” The area was known for the nightlife, eateries and shopping. No visit to Philadelphia was complete without a visit to South Street, and most importantly, the epicurean fantasy known as Ron’s Ribs. In 2001, Washington opened another location near the campus of Temple University, but due to heart failure and his declining health, Ron’s Ribs slowly lost its steam. In 2002, Ron Washington passed away and Ron’s Ribs closed. Two years later, his youngest brother Kevin, re-opened the restaurant. Kevin he hoped to continue the Ron Rib’s legacy and pave the way for Ron’s two young sons to carry on their father’s business. Under Kevin’s management, Ron’s Ribs flourished. From numerous awards, to appearances on national television, to articles in Black Entertainment magazine, it seemed like Ron’s legacy would live on. However, in December 2008, the South Street Bridge closed. This drastically reduced traffic to the area. Sadly, the business was forced to close in 2010 due to the decrease in sales directly linked to the bridge closure.

Currently Ron’s Ribs is closed, but the once thriving hub of African-American business is again on the rise to relive the glory days. The area has been rebirthed as a premier neighborhood. Above all, the demand for Ron’s Ribs still remains. There have been numerous inquiries about the re-opening of Ron’s Ribs. Philadelphians and Tourists alike miss the legendary Ron’s Ribs on South Street. Due to the recent phenomenon of urban renewal, it is evident the area will continue to grow and flourish. Ron’s Ribs has the opportunity to re-emerge with great results. Not only would the reestablishment cater to the demand of consumers, but the business will create new jobs for the community. The return of a 30-year old business would receive a great deal of press recognition. Ron’s Ribs is sure to make an incredible comeback with the help of investors.
Brandon Washington raised $925 in 7 days.

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Created by Brandon Washington
Brandon Washington raised $925 in 7 days.

Want to launch your own personal fundraiser for free? Click the button below to get started.

How it works Start a fund